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Trying to Make a Homemade Comforter

tzullinger's picture

Hi everyone!  I am somewhat new to sewing.  I know the basics of how to sew and   I am trying to find out how to make a homemade comforter, not a duvet cover and not a quilt.  I am looking for something basic to make so that I can use the material that matches our bedroom.  Does anyone have suggestions on where to start or how to find a book on this subject or even a pattern?  Please help, I've been looking for days and can't find a thing.


Thank you,


Tonya Zullinger


 

justTISH's picture

(post #30241, reply #1 of 1)

Tonya, I don't know if this is an answer to your question or not, but here goes.  When I was a girl we had some comforters that had been made by women in my grandmother's family.  They were made the same way because it was how that family got another generation out of old, worn blankets.  It may have been a standard early sewing project for the girls.


A top and bottom cover the same size as  a worn blanket were sewn from sturdy cotton, usually one was patterned and one was a matching solid.  These were layered with the old blanket between them, seam sides in, and thoroughly pinned.  Then at about three inch intervals, a stitch of knitting worsted wool was sewn through; two loops in the sames holes, and double knotted and cut with about three quarters of an inch of thread.  The tied side of the knots were all on one side of the fabric.  The edges were sewn together and a blanket binding sewn around for finish.


For a long time I thought that a comforter was a quilt-like bedcover that was knotted rather than quilted.  Now, It seems to be anything from a blanket to a quilt to what used to be called a "coverlid."  You could do this with a light fluffy quilt batting much more easily than with an old wool blanket.  A few years ago I saw a woman knotting a comforter that she had machine pieced for her son.  She was using six-strand embroidery floss to knot, and was pulling the needle through with pliers!


 

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