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KraftyK's picture

Hello ladies,


 I need your help. I can crochet wool longie soakers but would like to put footies on them. Does anyone have step by step direction how to add footies for babies? I am going to start crocheting some new wool longies do I start the toe area or just crochet like I do for longies then add footis?I never crochet socks before. Can you please help me?

sewchris703's picture

(post #29363, reply #39 of 63)

Here's an online history of the disposable diaper.  Not the original one I read but similar.  http://www.disposablediaper.net/content.asp?


Chris 

Josefly's picture

(post #29363, reply #40 of 63)

A very interesting history. Thank you for the reference. Since I primarily used cloth diapers, and my exposure to disposables ended by 1978, I've been mostly unaware of the various technological improvements. I don't think my grandson ever saw a cloth diaper, but I didn't pay too much attention to the improvements in absorbency, fit, convenience, etc. on the occasions when I cared for him. If my memory serves, when I first used them in 1971, diaper pins were still required.

This article, while written with an industrial bias, does generate thought about the economic and environmental consequences of almost total reliance on them - still not much in use in heavily populated countries like China and India.

What a relief to realize there is a movement toward re-usable products.

ThreadKoe's picture

(post #29363, reply #41 of 63)

Thank you for the link sewchris.  Most interesting!  Altho I was a cloth diaper mom in the late eighties, I did use some disposables towards the end with two little ones in diapers at the same time.  The ones that the the new moms use now are so different!  ( I still prefer the cloth myself, even if it is more work, tee hee)  Cathy

sewchris703's picture

(post #29363, reply #42 of 63)

Joy says that she doesn't wear paper underwear and sees no reason why her kids should.  I used disposibles for when Dylan was at daycare.  The provider would have accepted cloth but I didn't want the hassle of carting the wet/dirty diapers home at the end of the day.  At home and when we went out, he wore cloth.  When the girls were in diapers, the disposible ones were so heavily perfumed, it was awful.  If left outside, the perfume smell would attract bees.  And Erica had such sentitive skin, that I couldn't use anything that had additives to it on her. 


Chris

ThreadKoe's picture

(post #29363, reply #43 of 63)

The perfumes they added to them was one reason I did not use them much.  The girls all had sensitive skin, and I am sensitive to the smell!  As if the diaper pail was not bad enough, tee hee.  I also disliked the thought of all that untreated human waste going to the dump.  I know that it is supposed to be rinsed in the toilet before disposal, but do you know anyone who really does it?  I don't.  Cathy

Lilith1951's picture

(post #29363, reply #44 of 63)

I agree with those of you using/have used cloth for diapering.  Back when I diapered my babies, cloth was a given if you were an at-home mom.  Mom's who worked and used day care were using disposables. (1972, 78 and 80)  I couldn't bare to use that crunchy paper on the babes unless we were traveling.  They were just not as soft..  And now....it makes my heart sick to think of all that non-biodegradeable stuff, not to mention....as said before....the human waste (ick) in the landfills. 


When I see new moms not only diapering with this stuff, but then buying "diaper genies" that wrap yet another layer of plastic around the garbage (to contain the odor so your home doesn't stink) and spit it out like a long sausage, it makes me ill.  Then I'm told that a lot of day care facililties refuse to use cloth diapers "for hygenic reasons"...hah!  I hope to make or buy cloth diapers for my grandbabies when they arrive, but I sure their mom's aren't facing that kind of outlook if they are working moms.  Sheesh. 


I never heard of "soakers" back in the 70's.  I would have had them for sure, since my one daughter had a lot of trouble with diaper rash/yeast infections due to the plastic pants worn over the cloth.  Of course, these days she's allergic to wool, so I don't know how she would have done with the wool either :(  My little tender girl.

ThreadKoe's picture

(post #29363, reply #45 of 63)

I wish I had known about soakers then also!  I used to just double them up around the house, the thinner ones on the outside, and check and change often.  The light vinyl ones were a bit better than the rubber, but shred easily.  Man o man I did a lot of laundry.  Cathy

Josefly's picture

(post #29363, reply #46 of 63)

Lilith, I had much the same experience as you. And, yes, as Cathy said, there was a lot of laundry to do. I'll bet I did at least a load a day, early on, with not just the diapers, but the water-proof pads on the bed, the sheets and other bedding. Thankfully, I didn't have to work while the kids were young.

And I had forgotten, until you mentioned wool-allergy, that we were warned by pediatricians not to put wool on the babies for their first year; it was to prevent their developing allergies to wool. I wonder what the common wisdom is about that these days?

sewchris703's picture

(post #29363, reply #47 of 63)

Am I the only one who started out with enough diapers and baby clothes to last 5-7 days?

Chris

Josefly's picture

(post #29363, reply #48 of 63)

Actually, I had a wonderful diaper service (a gift) early on. And plenty of baby clothes, too, I thought, but with spit-ups and leak-throughs, etc., and bedding, it was easy to have a load of laundry every day or every other.

sewchris703's picture

(post #29363, reply #49 of 63)

It all depends on how big the appliances are and how many clothes are worn. And what kind of a spitter upper the baby is. I did 3 loads a week before kids (1 of coloreds, 1 of whites/sheets, and one of towels). When Joy was born, 2-3 more loads were added so you are right. But since I did laundry once a week in the laundry room at the apt, those 3 extra loads of laundry only took the same amount of time as I was doing before. Just more machines and quarters. And I did the diapers at my mil's so I could hang them out on her clothes line. While the diapers were drying, we ran errands, did grocery shopping, etc. So it never seemed like more laundry.

Chris

ThreadKoe's picture

(post #29363, reply #51 of 63)

Tee hee, I guess what I said left you with a bit of a misunderstanding.  Between the barn laundry, with the washrags that needed washing every day, the barn clothes that needed regular washing, plus diapers, plus regular laundry, I did laundry, at least 2 loads every day, one of which had to be hung out to dry.  I did have a dryer, but I only used it for the light and small stuff to save electricity.  In the winter, our old house was not well insulated at the time, and our washer water often froze, so I had to haul the water to fill the darn thing.  It took a lot of time to do laundry.  When I had 3 small ones, one training, and two in diapers, it was impossible to keep up without washing diapers daily just to keep up with the smell!  tee hee!  I would not have changed it for the world, it was an experience!  Cathy

sewchris703's picture

(post #29363, reply #52 of 63)

Ah, that does explain it. It sounds similar to what my mom went through with laundry in Iowa back when my sisters and I were in diapers. She had 3 in diapers (I was 10 months old when my twin sisters were born 2 months early) with the washing machine in the basement, no dryer. While they lived in town, my dad was in construction and came home filthy every evening. He headed straight down to the basement to change and shower. The clothes had to be hung in the basement during the winter.

Chris

ThreadKoe's picture

(post #29363, reply #53 of 63)

It sounds harder than it was when I read back over it, tee hee.  Life is and experience to be relished.  Cathy

KraftyK's picture

(post #29363, reply #54 of 63)

I finally finished the footies wool soaker .Here's pictures and my model. I am so proud of myself.


 


http://i208.photobucket.com/albums/bb18/kareybear_2007/DSC01027.jpg


http://i208.photobucket.com/albums/bb18/kareybear_2007/DSC01030.jpg


Edited 11/25/2008 1:27 pm ET by KraftyK

sewchris703's picture

(post #29363, reply #55 of 63)

Those are so cute. And I love the way the colors pooled.

CHris

KraftyK's picture

(post #29363, reply #56 of 63)

Thank You... It is a great color. I am happy with it.Just in time for the winter too.

rodezzy2's picture

(post #29363, reply #57 of 63)

Wow, those are so wonderful.  You should check out crochetpatterncentral.com and add them to thier list.  I don't know how they post them, but I'm sure there is something on the site to instruct you how to do that. 

ThreadKoe's picture

(post #29363, reply #58 of 63)

Those are soooo cute!  I love the colours.  You did really well.  Such a handsome model too.  Adorable smile.  Looks like he was not so hard to work with either, tee hee.  Cathy

namenotinuse's picture

(post #29363, reply #59 of 63)

Thank You but he is a She. I know I know she looks exactly like her daddy.

ThreadKoe's picture

(post #29363, reply #60 of 63)

OOOPS!  My most sincere apologies.  From the pic I assumed...  well, you know... assume, makes an #### out of u and me.  I am so sorry.  SHE has a beautiful smile.  And SHE looked like a beautiful and easy model to work with.  I hope we are to be honoured with more pics with crochet garments with this darling model in the future.  Cathy

KraftyK's picture

(post #29363, reply #61 of 63)

I totally understand. It is always hard to tell sometimes. I have a matching hat as well. I have made shorties if you want to see those and recycled longies as well. Thanks again for your apologies.

ThreadKoe's picture

(post #29363, reply #62 of 63)

I ALWAYS want to see!  I love seeing what people have done!  It gets the creative juices flowing, and gets me working towards finishing my painfully slow UFOS!  Please do post more pics.  Cathy

Josefly's picture

(post #29363, reply #63 of 63)

Just got around to seeing your photos. What a darling granddaughter, and cute, cuddly soaker(s?).

KraftyK's picture

(post #29363, reply #50 of 63)

Ok Ladies I finished my footies wool soaker yesterday and she wore it to a church function. She looks so snuggly and warm. I took picture. I will try to download the picture on computer today. I am not feeling to well. Exhausted.

sewchris703's picture

(post #29363, reply #7 of 63)

Have you tried the library for old crochet books? I have several crochet pattern books from the 70s and 80s that have footed pants and catsuits that can be used as footed longies.

Chris

KraftyK's picture

(post #29363, reply #8 of 63)

Thanks for tip. I already did that. My library is very small and only had to crochet books nothing to do with baby stuff.

damascusannie's picture

(post #29363, reply #9 of 63)

Does your library belong to any sort of inter-library loan program? Here in Wisconsin, our local libraries all belong to a regional library system that allows us to go on-line and order books from any of the other libraries within the system. I can search by subject, author, title, etc...It effectively gives me access to much, much larger libraries. Right now, every library book in our house except one is from another library.

In addition, our librarian can order books for us through WIS-CAT (Wisconsin Catalog) which covers all the libraries in the whole state and even libraries in other states.

Annie in Wisconsin, USA
~~Doodlestein Designs Quilt Patterns
~~Finely Finished: Machine quilting worked on a treadle sewing machine.
See patterns, quilting, and National sewing machines at: http://community.webshots.com/user/damascusannie

Annie in Wisconsin, USA ~~Doodlestein Designs Quilt Patterns ~~Finely Finished: Machine quilting worked on a treadle sewing machine. See patterns, quilting, and National sewing machines at: http://community.webshots.com/user/damas...
KraftyK's picture

(post #29363, reply #10 of 63)

Thank You for info. No they don't I was in shock when I heard that they don't that. You know I was looking in youtube.com and found a video how to make baby booties. I think I am going to do that but without added the lacing and such. I will let you know how it turns out. It probably take me a week or two to get it done. Since I have an infant and two older girls. Thank You so much for your help.

damascusannie's picture

(post #29363, reply #11 of 63)

There's one library in our area that refuses to join the MORE system, but I think they are going to be forced into it by pressure by the town board which provides most of their funding. They have noticed that they are seeing fewer and fewer people every quarter and when they did a bit of asking around, they learned that folks were driving to other libraries so that they could order books and stuff through MORE.

They've hinted to our librarian that they'd be interested in hiring her if she is looking for a change because she made such a big turn-around in our library in just five years. She took us from almost no patronage to one of the highest in the whole system in terms of the numbers of books that pass through, and now we have one full-time librarian and two part-time librarians on staff, a new library that's rapidly out-growing its space and a dozen special programs for kids and adults. She's a pistol and I sure hope that our town board does whatever it takes to keep her!

Annie in Wisconsin, USA
~~Doodlestein Designs Quilt Patterns
~~Finely Finished: Machine quilting worked on a treadle sewing machine.
See patterns, quilting, and National sewing machines at: http://community.webshots.com/user/damascusannie

Annie in Wisconsin, USA ~~Doodlestein Designs Quilt Patterns ~~Finely Finished: Machine quilting worked on a treadle sewing machine. See patterns, quilting, and National sewing machines at: http://community.webshots.com/user/damas...