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Crochet Wool soakers

KraftyK's picture

Hello ladies,


 I need your help. I can crochet wool longie soakers but would like to put footies on them. Does anyone have step by step direction how to add footies for babies? I am going to start crocheting some new wool longies do I start the toe area or just crochet like I do for longies then add footis?I never crochet socks before. Can you please help me?

starzoe's picture

(post #29363, reply #1 of 63)

For babies you really do not need actual feet shapes, have you thought of making the legs longer to allow for feet?

KraftyK's picture

(post #29363, reply #2 of 63)

Well I live in area that has snow and would like to keep the baby warm with wool feeties because the darn socks keeps falling off.

starzoe's picture

(post #29363, reply #3 of 63)

I guess I didn't make myself very clear - what I meant that as you are crocheting the "longies" (which I suppose are soakers with legs, why not continue down the legs until the work is long enough to cover the feet and then finish them off so that there is a seam to enclose the feet?

KraftyK's picture

(post #29363, reply #4 of 63)

Ok Now I understand. You right since she isn't crawling or walking. That might work. Thanks for the tip.

Teaf5's picture

(post #29363, reply #5 of 63)

What is a "soaker"?

KraftyK's picture

(post #29363, reply #6 of 63)

Wool soaker is replacement of rubber pants for prefolded diapers (cloth diapers) They are great and breathable so no diaper rashes.

Teaf5's picture

(post #29363, reply #12 of 63)

Ah, so that's how mothers coped before plastic and rubber!  I can't imagine using wool on my child out here in sunny California, though, even in winter....

KraftyK's picture

(post #29363, reply #13 of 63)

I used to live in California and I won't use wool longies either but since I live in Missouri that has snow on the ground. They will be warmy and toasty on my baby.  You also need to remember wool breaths so much better than PUL diaper covers and wool in the warm month keeps the baby cool as well.

sewchris703's picture

(post #29363, reply #14 of 63)

We live in San Diego and my granddaughter wears wool soakers (both hand knit and woven) even during Santa Anas.  The felted longies made from a thrift store sweater is perfect during the night when it is cold and dry.  Wool can actually keep you cool in hot weather because it wicks sweat away from the body.


Chris

Teaf5's picture

(post #29363, reply #15 of 63)

In San Diego, that makes sense. Up in the Central Valley, where the summer average temperature is well above 100 degrees daily, we put away our wools in March and don't take them out again till November. We do, however, keep one wool sweater on hand in our air-conditioned offices, which are freezing!

KraftyK's picture

(post #29363, reply #16 of 63)

I understand why you won't wear wool in the 100 degree weather but do you understand what wool soaker are. If you do you would put your child in them then the rubber pants that make them sweat and hot. So wool would be best for this situation.


 

Teaf5's picture

(post #29363, reply #18 of 63)

I never heard of wool soakers, but fortunately my children are two decades past needing them...

sewchris703's picture

(post #29363, reply #17 of 63)

We get our 100+ temperatures in the fall.  Wool soakers are perfect for Santa Ana weather.  No hot house effect that plastic pants give.  The wool breathes and allows for cooling. 


Chris

Teaf5's picture

(post #29363, reply #19 of 63)

Wool soakers don't leak?

ThreadKoe's picture

(post #29363, reply #20 of 63)

The cotton diaper absorbs most of the wet, and the soaker prevents the diaper's wetness from soaking outward too quickly, and acts as an extra layer of absorbency that wicks the moisture away from the cotton.  Yes, they can leak, just as the rubber can when the diaper is really wet.  But because you notice any dampness sooner, you tend to change baby's bottom sooner, which is healthier.   Cathy


Edited 11/7/2008 9:28 pm ET by ThreadKoe

sewchris703's picture

(post #29363, reply #21 of 63)

As ThreadKoe said, wool soakers don't leak if the baby is changed on time.  Babies (and toddlers) in diapers should be changed about every 2-3 hours.  Because disposibles have a gel in them that keeps the layer next to the baby dry longer, parents tend not to change them until the diaper are ready to explode.  If the gel gets onto the baby, the diaper has been worn way too long.  Any diaper should be changed every time the baby pees in it.


Chris

Teaf5's picture

(post #29363, reply #27 of 63)

I never used disposables, only cotton from a diaper service, but our ten-pounder went through doubled cotton ones every hour or so, so I couldn't imagine making or laundering enough soakers to keep up with him, especially with our water rationing.  But it's an interesting option.


Edited 11/11/2008 1:16 pm by Teaf5

sewchris703's picture

(post #29363, reply #28 of 63)

Since the lanolin neutralizes the ammonia from the urine, soakers don't have to be changed as often as the diaper does.  They can go for up to a month before having to be "washed" and re-lanolized.  It all depends on how long the lanolin lasts.  And felted soakers last longer between lanolizing than the knited ones.   Lindsay has 9--7 soakers and 2 longies.  We are starting on newborn ones for Joy's 3rd due the end of January.


Chris

KraftyK's picture

(post #29363, reply #22 of 63)

LIke everyone said it can leak as so does rubber pants but you have to lanolize the wool soaker with Lansinoh Lanolin or Wool Cure etc... that helps to water proof the wool soakers. Lanolin is a oil from a lamb/sheep. It is all natural.

KharminJ's picture

(post #29363, reply #23 of 63)

Ooh - yes! Lanolin. Good stuff! It's what makes raw roving feel "icky", and is usually stripped off in processing the wool. Replacing it for water-resistance makes perfect sense.

I have a very old bottle of Lanolin-Plus, that my mom used as conditioner for her hair - thirty or forty years ago.

So, where does one acquire said "Lansinoh Lanolin or Wool Cure"? Is it a dime-store/drug-store or yarn-shop type item, or does one *have* to go online?

Here we go - off learning and sharing all kinds of new stuff! Wahoo! What a great ride!

Love and Hugs to you all!

Kharmin

KraftyK's picture

(post #29363, reply #24 of 63)

You can buy Lansinoh Lanolin  at Walmart,Target in the baby department that is used for breastfeeding moms. Woolcure you will have to buy online as well wool wash. I used Eucalan that you don't have to rinse. I am liking that. I am also trying out Kookoburra woolwash and not sure yet. I bought the kookoburra and woolcure used because one mom child was allergic to wool and sold me a couple wool wraps and the stuff. I wanted to try it out. Lansinoh Lanolin I like but it sometime hard to get to liquify like oil instead of little clumps.

KharminJ's picture

(post #29363, reply #25 of 63)

Thanks for the quick answer! Target it is!

Kharmin

KraftyK's picture

(post #29363, reply #26 of 63)

Oh here what it looks like scroll to Lansinoh lanonlin and also click on the video (wash botton) how to lanolize the soaker as well.  Some moms put a squirt of the lanolin in a cup of cold water and heat in the microwave or stove. Another tip.


http://www.greenmountaindiapers.com/other.htm#lanolinother


Edited 11/10/2008 7:59 am ET by KraftyK

thehat's picture

(post #29363, reply #29 of 63)

in a place where animal feed and fencing  or vets resides

Josefly's picture

(post #29363, reply #31 of 63)

If lanolin makes the wool water-resistant, or water-proof, doesn't that make it non-absorbent? Seems like the urine in the diaper would simply run through the wool. No? How does this work.

sewchris703's picture

(post #29363, reply #33 of 63)

The lanolin reacts with the urine and converts it into water which just evaporates .  If the baby is in the diaper too long or wets a lot at one time, then the soaker will wick the urine to the outside when pressure it put on the soaker; i.e., when the baby is sitting down.   Another advantage of wool is that it keeps the body an even temperature, warm when it's cold and cool when it's hot.


Edited to add:  My granddd wore her felted wool longies all night last night (8pm to 7am) without wicking through.  After changing, she still has it on until the temperature warms up.  Then she will go into soakers for the day.  We are in the middle of a Santa Ana--hot and dry.


Chris


Edited 11/17/2008 10:53 am ET by sewchris703

Josefly's picture

(post #29363, reply #35 of 63)

Wow, that is amazing. Disposable diapers were just becoming available when my children were in diapers, and they were expensive. I used cotton diapers and rubber (plastic I guess) pants, and didn't know anything about the wool soakers. There were inserts for the diapers that were supposed to wick the wetness away from the baby's skin, and those worked well, but I don't think they were wool - some kind of synthetic. Thanks for catching me up.

sewchris703's picture

(post #29363, reply #36 of 63)

I'm guessing then that you are close to my age.  Our girls were born in 78, 80, and 84.  We got married in 73.  I used prefold diapers and plastic pants for them.  I didn't make fitted diapers until our son was born in 98.  And I still used plastic pants for him.  I didn't mean to imply that I made the crochet soakers back then.  They were designed to go over plastic pants and were made out of acrylic yarn.  I hadn't heard of soakers back then.  It wasn't until my oldest dd, Joy, requested cloth diapers for her kids.  She found out about wool soakers.  I've since made some out of a felted wool sweater and wool fabric.  She is the knitter.  So far we haven't found a good wool yarn subsitute for the acrylic called for in the old patterns.   And we need to experiment with making them bigger and felting them down to fit.


Edited to add:  disposibles are older than that.  I remember my mom not being impressed with them back when my brother was in diapers.  And he was  born in 1960.  I read an online history of disposibles and they were invented by a woman back in the 30s or 40s (if I remember right).


Chris


Edited 11/18/2008 10:23 am ET by sewchris703

Josefly's picture

(post #29363, reply #37 of 63)

Hi. I guess I just wasn't aware of the disposables, then. My son was born in '71, my daughter in '75. By the time my daughter came along, the disposables were in widespread use, but I preferred the cotton ones, except for times when we were traveling. I wish I'd known about the wool soakers. What a terrific thing - so much better for babies' skin.

Thanks for filling me in!

starzoe's picture

(post #29363, reply #38 of 63)

Oh how I wish that disposables were available in 1963. We were returning from Britain by ship and I spent a goodly part of the trip, in January, in high seas, dutifully washing terry cloth diapers in the bowels of the ship, throwing up through the whole thing as the ship rocked and rolled.