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Re: nonfusible waistbanding for slacks

jenniferbabs's picture

I need some help in selecting a non fusible waistbanding for a lovely pair of Super 100 wool slacks. I used a fusible for the original waistband, but it peeled off. How is ban-roll? I have never used it and am wondering if it would be appropriate. Thank you for your help!

(I would like to finish up the two pairs of slacks I am making.)

ElonaM's picture

(post #24431, reply #1 of 3)

Ban roll is great! I have used a couple of types, the regular, rather stiff-feeling one that you're familiar with, and another Ban Roll that is slightly elastic, which is what I mostly use these days.

A little booklet by Palmer and Pletsch called "Pants For Any Body" has a very nice installation technique for a tailored waistband using this material.

jenniferbabs's picture

(post #24431, reply #2 of 3)

Thank you very much Elona! Tomarrow I am planning on going out to purchase some Ban Roll.

Wishing you much success,

Jen

Crish's picture

(post #24431, reply #3 of 3)

I've been very happy with the traditional Banroll but recently I've used petersham as a waistband interfacing/backing in one with great results.  It's firm but flexible (interpret as confortable), shapes for waist curve and makes less bulk in a waistband.


 


Cut waistband from fashion fabric as usual.  With very soft or lightweight fabrics I fuse outer half + 1/2" over the fold line with very lightweight but stable Sew Sheer ( have NEVER had a problem with it peeling away).  Fold in half lengthwise, wrong sides together and press well.  Open flat.  Lay edge of petersham just inside pressed fold line on backside of waistband.  Stitch as close to edge as possible.  Trim bask part of waistband 1/4" from stitching.  Stitch waistband to garment, allowing fabric for finishing ends.  Press seam allowance toward waistband.  Fold in ends at closure (one flush with zipper edge, the other long enough to allow for underlap).  Press firmly.  Hand or machine stitch at ends.  Machine stitch-in-the ditch from the front making certain to catch the petersham edge on the back side.  For machine stitching, patersham needs to be about 1/4" wider than waistband.  For hand finishing, same width works.