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Hong Kong finish with underlining

Marie-Elena's picture

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I thought I saw a Threads article wherein underlining attachment simultaneously created a Hong Kong finish, wrapping the raw edges of both layers of fabric. Then garment was constructed. I can't find any reference to it in Threads index. Can anyone out there remember this technique or did I dream it?

Shannon_Gifford's picture

(post #24370, reply #1 of 5)

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I don't remember it being in Threads, but I have seen it at several Expos and referred to in a couple of books. One book is "Power Sewing, Step by Step" by Sandra Betzina. I think Margaret Islander was given credit for the technique, so check her materials as well.
HTH

Shannon_Gifford's picture

(post #24370, reply #2 of 5)

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Yes, Maureen, that is the same technique. In fact, Sandra B. gives credit to M. Islander for the idea. It's ingenious! I've used it on pants and skirts recently. I really, really like it on skirts, because it feels like one layer when worn...no twisting or sagging linings. It also lets me use really interesting fabrics (like the loud prints I really love) for the underlining/linings. You really need to try this; it's one of those "Why didn't I think of that?" moments!

Marie-Elena's picture

(post #24370, reply #3 of 5)

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This sounds like what I'm looking for. Is the underlining cut larger than the fashion fabric to allow for the "binding" part? When assembling the garment, is a smaller than normal (5/8") seam allowance used, since part of the seam allowance was used to attach the underlining? If so, I assume the pattern must have been tested earlier, as there is less room for error now.

petex2000's picture

(post #24370, reply #4 of 5)

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So each pattern piece is finished this way
b PRIOR
to assembly?

I guess we're talking about just the 2 pants fronts and 2 backs. Would you use this for any pocketing?

I've got one of Margaret's tapes. She's an incredible resource.

Shannon_Gifford's picture

(post #24370, reply #5 of 5)

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Pockets would be a great place to use this technique.
Yes, you do this before putting the pieces together. From the inside, it looks like you underlined the piece and did a Hong Kong finish with matching fabric. It is MUCH easier than that...looks really, really good, but definitely use a pattern for which you have already checked the fit. I am currently using this technique for bridesmaids' dresses. Think of how much easier this will be to alter!