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Bias skirt

Lukeria_'s picture

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Is there any way to cut a skirt on the bias when the pattern is not for a bias skirt? My daughter wants a skirt that fits like an A-Line but not as full but has a little flare at the bottom. Also I 'm making flower girl dresses out of sheer dotted swiss and organza,is there any place I can get sheer invisible zippers. Next qustion,sorry. Whenever I put a zipper in and follow their directions it never looks right or store bought.How do I get it to look like it was bought not home made? thank you.

whitesew's picture

(post #24377, reply #1 of 6)

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Bias Skirt-

You simply nee to change the grain line on the pattern to a bias line. To do this crossmark the vertical grainline with another line that is horizontal, then make a bais line that is half way between the vertical and horizontal lines. Use that bais line as your new grainline making it even with the selvage of your fabric. [Imagine you are cutting a pie in eight pieces. In half, in half again and then divide each section in half again. Each piece will be a 45o wedge and so will your pattern with this method you will have a 45o grainline.]

Zippers-

I do lots of zippers. I like making the lapped zipper best and I use several different methods depending on the garment. I never follow the instructions on the zipper package or the pattern guide, they make the job too hard.

Try this one. Sew the normal seam using a large basting stitch for the area where the zipper should be, bar tack 1/2" above the bottom of the zipper and then continue the seam below the zipper with a normal length stitch. Press this seam open. Now remove the basting stitches. On the garment right side repress the seam allowance so it will be a now a 1/2" folded back rather than the 5/8". [Sometimes I like to allow more seam allowance width for the zipper than 5/8", even 1".] Now lay the zipper along the 1/2" fold and edge stitch. I like to use double stick tape so that I won't stretch out the fabric. Now lay the 5/8" fold over the zipper so the stitches are hidden, again I use double stick tape. Stitch through the left side 1/2" from the fold sewing the same direction as you did the right side [bottom to top].
Really I just wish I could show you. Can you come over?

Mary_Martin's picture

(post #24377, reply #2 of 6)

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When sewing a bias garment, is there any special handling for sewing the seams? Please advise. Thanks. Mary

Judy_Williment's picture

(post #24377, reply #3 of 6)

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There's a great article in Threads 99 about bias cut garments. "Hands on with Kleibacker". There's also a link to his website, both of which have loads of useful info on dealing with bias cut garments. I can't recommend these sites highly enough. Hope you find them helpful. (I think the Threads homepage has a link to Kleibacker's site too, under "Events"). Good luck.

Mary_Martin's picture

(post #24377, reply #4 of 6)

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Thank you!! Will check out his website and check my stash of Threads, I subscribe to the magazine. Mary

MEEB4's picture

(post #24377, reply #5 of 6)

If you are changing the grainline on an existing pattern, make sure you have enough ease in the side seams.  A bias skirt will hang narrower and longer to an amazing degree depending on the fabric you're using.   You might also want to hang the skirt and baste (yeah, but sometimes you gotta do it ) the side seams while it's hanging to prevent puckers when you sew. I've never seen a sheer zipper, but I'd check Threads articals or a bridal/special occasion sewing book for tips on handling zippers in a sheer.  Don't rule out hand picking - it's almost always the easiest and best look on a tricky fabric.

ClaireDuffy's picture

(post #24377, reply #6 of 6)

I, too have wondered how to turn a straight grain pattern to a bias one. The garments I have cut from a commercial pattern are obviously wider but I don't know if there is a rule of thumb. I have very successfully made the bias cut skirt in the Threads magazine and I love wearing it and watching the fabric flip and flow as I walk along. As for Zips, I recommend the lapped zip as you can't see the zip once it is done up. I often spend time in retail stores examining the techniques used. 2nd-hand shops are great for this. I also absolutely love the invisible zip and use it whenever I can. I recently put one in and pinned it at top and pulled it taught against the edge of where it was to go in and marked with a pin where the bottom of the zip was to finish on both sides of the edge. As I sewed I kept checking that the zip was finishing evenly at the bottom. My most common problem with putting in a zip is one side ends up lower than the other. Sewing both sides of the zip from the top helps to keep the tension the same