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Backing on a blue jean throw

Jonagold's picture

I'm in need of opinions, please.


I'm in the process of making a blue jean throw for a fundraiser.  Usually, I back the throws with a quality flannel sheet or cotton sheet.  My jean throw is made of torn pieces that are stitched together so the grain is straight even if the pieces have sometimes been worn out of shape.  Most of my jean projects are made of squares, rectangles, etc., not random pieces. 


When the top is complete, I take the measurements and tear the backing.  Then I ease or stretch, if needed, the top on to the back and stitch the two together with machine basting around the edges.  Everything is  squared up, on grain.  Next, I "attach" the throw to a plastic table top with packaging tape until everything is stretched out, even and flat.  I would use a quilting frame, if I had one.  Then I safety pin it together where I will be tying it.  The tape is removed.  I tie it and bind it.  The problem is that I am bothered as sometimes there are uneven spots where there is excess fabric as the fabrics go back to their original worn shape.  It is square or on grain but it doesn't look as flat as I would like when I'm finished.  I do preshrink the sheet so that isn't the problem.


My question is...should I skip the stretching and making the top and the backing on grain, and just make the back flat  to fit the top so the appearance is more attractive.  Will there be problems when it is washed later if I do that?


Any thoughts would be appreciated.  

suesew's picture

(post #25195, reply #1 of 3)

I think the clue is in your own writing "the pieces are sometimes worn out of shape." I would take them as they are and measure them instead of ripping for straight of grain. Have you considered using raw edges showing or backing with polar fleece?

Jonagold's picture

(post #25195, reply #2 of 3)

Good suggestions!  It would save so much time not to bind the edges.  I usually use ultasuede so binding doesn't take as much time and have as much bulk as using a fabric binding.  The polar fleece would be more forgiving and add some fluffiness.  I think I have some in my stash.  It would really be warm but not as heavy in weight as the flannel.   Thank you.

Pattiann42's picture

(post #25195, reply #3 of 3)

This style is popular.  You do not have to put a backing on it as the back is smooth.


Add a block of cotton print to the denim blocks that are thin.  Let the additional block fringe too.


http://www.patchwork-and-quilting.com/rag-quilt.html


 


 


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