NEW: Search The Forums

Loading

Hospital Shoe Covers

maricella's picture

Does anyone know the measurements for making those shoe covers worn in hospitals?  We have just purchased new carpet and I would like to make some for my husband and I to wear at home.  I'm sure they would save my new carpet from getting dirty sooner.  They would need to be fuss-free for my husband to go along with the idea.  Thanks

starzoe's picture

(post #23734, reply #1 of 6)

In some parts of the world, shoes are taken off when entering a home. We grew up (in Western Canada) doing this and most of my friends now do the same. For more formal occasions , guests are allowed shoes. A few people I know have washable slippers at the door for guests to wear. It seems to be a given that you remove your shoes when you enter someone's home....or are we strange here in Canada? Have you asked your husband if he would wear slippers or slippersox around the house? It might even reduce wear on your carpet.

The plumbers, painters, and practically all service people who come into our homes have the kind of shoe coverings you mention; they are included in their toolbox.

sewslow67's picture

(post #23734, reply #2 of 6)

I don't think you are strange, here in Canada Starzoe.  It's common sense and, not only saves the carpet, but it keeps a lot of germs out of the home that are normally tracked in when wearing shoes.  After all, think about it:  people in most countries people wear their shoes (that have been worn through dirt and heaven knows "whatever")  inside and then the baby crawls in this "stuff".  No wonder so many children get sick with serious diseases in other parts of the world.  I notice that in BC where I currently live, very few babies seem to get sick. 


I grew up in Oregon, and we always parked our shoes at the door.  But this was not the practice in the US back then, and is only beginning to be the practice of a few friends today.  DH (who is Canadian) always removes his shoes when we visit my friends in the US, and some who have resisted this practice are starting to do the same.  The last time we were there, one couple even had booties and shoe covers inside their front door.  Personally, I think it's a sensible practice and admire Canadians for setting a good example.

paddyscar's picture

(post #23734, reply #3 of 6)

Hi Maricella:


I have taken a picture, and hopefully it is attached.


The fabric is folded along the right hand side of the picture, which is the heel area of the shoe.


Elastic (red dash line) is sewn from the instep around to the heel and back to the instep.


Another length of elastic is sewn in the seam from the instep, around the front of the toe and along the bottom of the boot.


Hope it makes sense,


Frances


 


Edited 10/5/2008 11:18 pm ET by paddyscar


Edited 10/5/2008 11:19 pm ET by paddyscar

PreviewAttachmentSize
hospital_shoe_cover_4.doc1.29 MB
hospital_shoe_cover_001.jpg
hospital_shoe_cover_001.jpg45.87 KB
paddyscar's picture

(post #23734, reply #4 of 6)

Sorry, I'm having trouble trying to attach this diagram for the hospital shoe dimensions.  Hopefully, it will work this time.


Frances

PreviewAttachmentSize
scan0001.pdf84.1 KB
ThreadKoe's picture

(post #23734, reply #5 of 6)

If you need to wear shoes inside the house, for proper foot support, I would suggest wearing indoor and outdoor shoes. The slipover covers slide around on your feet and are a nuisance as they tend to catch on the carpet. There are slipper like coverings for shoes and boots that work better. They have stiff soles that do not catch or slip. They are like regular felt slippers you just slide your shoes into for those quick in and out trips into the house. You do not have to bend down to slide them on, and men are more apt to use them. http://www.leevalley.com/home.aspx have them if you check out their website if you want to see what they look like. You could make them yourself. Cathy


Edited 10/6/2008 10:06 am ET by ThreadKoe

Sancin's picture

(post #23734, reply #6 of 6)

Those disposable shoe covers are dirt cheap and all over hospitals - used for patients who don't have slippers or shoes. I would just ask someone who goes to a hospital to pick one up for you. I wore them for years. I believe they are simply envelopes (without the flap) with elastic around the top - one size fits all. So calculate the length of your feet and determine how high you want them and go for it.