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Your favorite Issey Miyake Patterns, ...

K.Kelly's picture

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As I have mentioned in two previous questions, I am a Miyake fanatic and am in the process of gathering information on the use of commercial patterns (using or based on his designs)in making wearable art. I am truly energized by the possibilities of what other such enthusiasts are and have done with his designs. If you have not looked at the other two questions I have posted ( on Japanese design enthusiasts or Vogue Individualist patterns, please do read them and let me know what you are thinking)I am interested in knowing:What were the very earliest patterns you tried? Why were you attracted to his work? Have your tastes embraced all of the patterns he has released or do you love certain shapes and shun others? Have you embellished his work or simplified it? Were there any other Vogue Individualist designers who you embraced so readily, and why? Do tell all!

Nancy_in_NM's picture

(post #26953, reply #1 of 64)

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I've been intrigued by your quest for information on this topic and thought I'd chime in at last.

I've only got one actual Mikyake pattern, #1476, and I was attracted to it because of the great coat design it features. This pattern has been around for several years, and I think it's still available. I haven't made it up yet because I'm still looking for the right fabric. My first thought was Pendleton blanket wool, but I now think that would be too heavy. Any other suggestions out there? The more I look at this pattern, the more I like it, so the blouse and pants will probably be made long before the coat. I'll probably make them from very plain fabrics let the design tell the story. Except for the coat, this pattern seems to look less Asian than some of his other work. I like the asymmetrical aspects and clean lines of Miyake's designs. I don't know if I'm going to get into much embellishment with them because the designs themselves are so interesting. Even the ones I haven't really liked(such as the futon coat), I've found fascinating from a consceptual standpoint.

Of Vogue's patterns, I also like Adri's designs. They are in the Vogue Attitudes line, which seems similar to the Vogue Individualist series. Her designs are also very streamlined and use a lot of single layer tailoring techiques and loop closures. The I have 1811 and 2148 of hers. Her perspective is different, but I think she shares the same sensibility about her work.

I also have some of the Lois Ericson and Sewing Workshop patterns. The Sewing Workshop did a lot to promote the Miyake styles beyond what Vogue was doing. I plan on making the Lotus Skirt soon, and also the Teagarden Tee. And Lois' patterns show the Miyake influence but most appear to be very simplified compared with his--more like she went back to the basic Asian forms and adapted them from there instead of borrowing from his designs. Her construction techniques can be very different from other designs I've seen. I'm looking forward to making the Lines and Angles vest and skirt and some of the tops from Kimono pattern.

I think this is a great topic and look forward to hearing from others, too.

Linda_in_Colorado's picture

(post #26953, reply #2 of 64)

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Nancy,
I have made both the blouse and pants of the Miyake pattern -- they are super!! I used a tone on tone geometric for the blouse, shortened the collar height to about half and love love love it!! I'm also still looking for the right fabric for the coat. But after the last few issues of threads, I am leaning to one of two treatments, wool gauze (light, airy, kind of floaty?) or the great felting techniques for light weight, drapeable felt. If you can't find it -- make it!!! I have a couple of other Miyake patterns, but went back to school, and haven't had time to do anything but imagine doing something with them.

Diane's picture

(post #26953, reply #3 of 64)

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The shirt from Vogue 1476 is marvellous with a full drapey back which isn't shown well on the pattern envelope. You would never want to tuck this shirt in as they have it. I have made it several times in silk noil, a silk and cotton blend and wool jersey. Diane Ericson redid the design in her Torii pattern by changing the cut of the collar, adding a placket and making a shorter as well as a longer length. I have seen both the Miyake and the Ericson versions on many people and they look great on everyone.
I made the coat in lightweight wool flannel and it was as fun to make as it is to wear. The only caveat is that the front drape of the coat can easily drag on the ground if you bend over to get something out of your car on a rainy day, etc.

Judy_Beaton's picture

(post #26953, reply #4 of 64)

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I have made the Vogue #1476 Miyake coat twice. The first was in a medium weight taupe wool. I enjoyed wearing it so much and getting the inevitable compliments that I decided to make another for evening wear. I chose a black silk twill which has the luster and semi-crisp feel of corded silk. It is somewhat heavy, but oh so beautiful. This fabric would have been prohibitively expensive but I lucked into a half-price sale. I made the evening coat 5 inches longer than the wool to suit my 5 ft.10 in. frame. A nice way of wearing the coat is to bring one side around your neck and to tuck it under the oposite lapel. It makes a nice faux turtleneck and somehow seems to stay put.

juliej_'s picture

(post #26953, reply #5 of 64)

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My thought for the 1476 coat is a light weight polar fleece. But I haven't made it yet.
If you make the tea garden tee do a pretest. When I measured the pattern I found the back larger than the front. Believe the drawing-there really is that much ease under the arm. I added to the front tuck and cut down the gusset and liked the results in chenille.

K.Kelly's picture

(post #26953, reply #6 of 64)

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As I have been looking back on Miyake's work and a book written in the 80's called New Fashion Japan, it says that the favorite material to use for this clothing was rayon, go figure! I am also finding that Flax, the clothing company, is using some very Miyakesesque materials this season The new ergonomic shoes that are all the rage(esprit and nine west)are also dynamite with this look. I also found that during the late 80's there was a pattern by Betty Jackson which I am still trying to find that achieved some of the same fabric manipulation used by the triumverate (Miyake,Kawakubo, and Yamamoto) it is pattern 1970.
In the mid 80's Carol Horn, Claude Montana, and Danny Noble were creating things in a Japanese sense but more along the lines of Kawakubo and Yamamoto. I am waiting for Threads to do an article on Yohji Yamamoto. He is doing some really fabulous things now. Vogue should get him to do some patterns for them (sportswear, dresses, and Eveningwear). The Lines and Angles pattern you refer to reminds me of a Mariot Chanet pattern I remember seeing. Geoffrey Beene is also some one to look at because Miyake studied with him, as well as the fact that he does some dynamite work!

Nancy_in_NM's picture

(post #26953, reply #7 of 64)

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Thanks, everyone, for the suggestions on 1476. Looks like I lucked into a good one (I found it in a clearance bin at one of my local fabric stores). I think it's really cool how everyone has contributed their ideas and suggestions. I think I might use polarfleece for the first time with the coat, relatively easy to work with and practical for the everchanging climate here.

Has anyone got any suggestions for the Lotus skirt? I have this great rayon fabric I'm planning to use, but I'm a little scared of the yoke. I think I'm going to make up a little sample first and test the fit. Any other hints?

sally's picture

(post #26953, reply #8 of 64)

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Nancy,
For the Lotus skirt I made up the yoke for a trial and changed it quite a lot for round hips - maybe too much. Made the skirt in silk noil. Don't love it but will go back and redo the zipper. There is a lot of bias in the yoke so it molds nicely. Important to use the stabilizing tape on the waist seam. I think I will use the standard yoke pattern next time.

Final adjustments can be made at the zipper side.
Let us know how yours turns out. I think rayon will be nice and drapey.

Diane's picture

(post #26953, reply #9 of 64)

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By all means make up a test yoke. I have high hips which can be hard to fit in this type of yoke so I added a waistband and that worked well for me. It is a beautiful skirt and will be very nice in a drapey rayon.

Lesley_H's picture

(post #26953, reply #10 of 64)

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I'm just about to make the #1476 coat in medium weight wool, K.K I was attracted to the drapey-look of the collar and the simple unlined structure. I started asking about this coat yesterday on SewingWorld and was directed over here where I find you discussing exactly what I need to know! These designs seem perfect to show off beautiful fabric, I wouldn't embellish them, just let the cut speak for itself. The more I look at IM designs the more I like them.

I was wondering how to lengthen the coat to fit me as I'm 5'10'. Now I have looked at the pattern layout I see that it won't be as difficult as I thought to add length, I'll just need to extend the "extension section". Is that right Judy B? What is the sizing like? It looks very big. By the envelope I'd be a Vogue 16. Having read your posts I'm now looking at making the shirt too, so want to make sure I get the right size...

K.Kelly's picture

(post #26953, reply #11 of 64)

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What about the other patterns,ladies? When I was looking at www.firstview.com I noticed that two of the current patterns in Vogue are shown as is and with some very interesting variations. One blouse has been lengthened to an ankle length dress, one has a tied cowl-like collar where on the pattern there is a crew neck. One has a skirt from a previous pattern used instead of the pants. Also, has anyone created the whole ensemble from Vogue 1693 (mother of the Hong Kong vest, and the Nikko Jacket) On the pattern cover it looked like crinkle cotton, but we all have seen lots of variations! Or... has anyone tried the Bamboo top in its variation blouse A cum skirt (vogue 1387). That is a pattern I have coveted for years. How could one adapt the Bamboo top to do that wonderful draping fishtail effect variation A has in the pattern if #1387 is never found? Food for thought...

Judy_Beaton's picture

(post #26953, reply #12 of 64)

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Hi Lesley H.

When it came to lengthening the coat, I just cut the bottom 5 inches longer. I didn't bother with the extension. It was an arbitrary decision. I thought that this extra length would be just right. It was.
I am the same height as you and have broad shoulders. The size I used for the #1476 coat was 14. In fitted clothing I usually take 16 or so. The size 14 coats are certainly big enough for me. There is so much ease that the coat just floats around you.

Judy_Beaton's picture

(post #26953, reply #13 of 64)

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Hi Lesley H.

I just realized that you said you wanted to make the Miyake Vogue #1476 shirt as well. I have not made this shirt (although I should, it is beautiful) and therefore cannot guarantee the size (14) for us "stately" types. You had better ask Diane (further up the list). She has experience with the shirt.

juliej_'s picture

(post #26953, reply #14 of 64)

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Nancy, A freind who has made the Lotus skirt said she would add a side seam next time. Good luck and lest us know how it goes.
Julie

barb_c's picture

(post #26953, reply #15 of 64)

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I too made the pattern #1476 and I love it. I made it about 9 years ago and still wear it. I would reccomend using a material with good drape to it. I used wool twill.

I am also tall (about 6') and it is still wonderful. I don't remember if I added lenght to it but I imagine if I could I did. I t is a good cape coat that I wear when I dress a bit better than jeans and a t-shirt.

I also made the IM dress which was two parts with a higher part in the front and a cascade in the back. I liked it better than the Sewing workshop pattern which is similar because it had some interesting piecing across the front of the skirt and top. It went in an S shape sort of adding to the cascading quality of the dress. I don't recall the number and I am not near my patterns so I can't get to it.

I also like that patterns of Claude Montana but have to consider my body type when I see them. I guess I can admire them without making them. :-)

K.Kelly's picture

(post #26953, reply #16 of 64)

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I think you may be refering to one of two patterns. Is it Vogue 2164? I don't have that one. I like the cascade dress' top but not the skirt. There are some older Montana patterns that would blow your mind! In fact, there were two of his patterns from early on that had blouses with trailing shirt tails. On little boys... a mother's worst nightmare, but for evening...exquisite! The pants for one and the skirt for the other I have seen variations of this very year done by Isaac Mizrahi for Vogue patterns and in Miyake's couture line for spring as seen on www.firstview.com. The skirt and pant are closed by a piece of fabric that folds over in a v-shape in the front and they look stunning! I think they probably would look dynamite in a black, or even better, midnight blue wool twill or gabardine.

K.Kelly's picture

(post #26953, reply #17 of 64)

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Ooops,
Miyake apprenticed with Hubert Givenchy not Geoffrey Beene. But Beene is groovy anyway!

barb_c's picture

(post #26953, reply #18 of 64)

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I remember making a pair of Claude Montana pants which had something like 17 pattern pieces. Now there is attention to detail! I made them in a tan linen blend.

Sue_Whelan's picture

(post #26953, reply #19 of 64)

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Kimberley, I made up the jacket, vest and pants from 1693 - my all-time favourite IM pattern, in 1990 for a trip to Paris. It turned out very well, and I felt very well-dressed. I made it out of a washed cotton/linen blend, sort of a pale, slate blue. I still have it but outgrew it :-( except for the jacket, which is very generous. If I made it again, I would square the front corners of the jacket a la Sewing Workshop, as I'm very round and the square lines flatter me more. I'm an apple, so most of IM's designs don't work for my body type. But his styles are the best, utterly timeless, really the classics of the last two decades. BTW, have you written to Butterick to ask them to reissue the IM patterns? I'm sending my email off today.

K.Kelly's picture

(post #26953, reply #20 of 64)

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( reply to Sue Whelan)
I tried to send the email, but it didn't work when I
did. I think I'll have to try again. The jacket you re describing sounds wonderful. I wonder what the entire ensemble ( jacket,skirt ,vest,pants) would look like in denim? I haven't yet decided how to do it. Or... do you think it would look better in a crepe or gabardine? I think they would each make a very different look.

lin_hendrix's picture

(post #26953, reply #21 of 64)

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>I too made "that shirt" from Vogue 1476 and it's truly a wonderful pattern.
>The pants from the same pattern were not. The pleats in the back were very unflattering even though the pants fit well (after all those adjustments I make on pants patterns). The waistband was also too high and no amount of interfacing was able to keep it from creasing deeply at the waist (I replaced it with a regular width waistband). I think these pants, pleats and all would probably look great on a woman 5'10" and 110 lbs. (not me)
--lin

Stacey's picture

(post #26953, reply #22 of 64)

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I, too, made the 1476 coat in polarfleece. However, in windy weather , the breeze blows right up the sleeves - I need to wear another layer underneath for it to be really warm. I also did the blouse in a cotton "marble" print - I have to wear it with a very slim skirt or pants. I know many of his blouses will be great for maternity.

Susan_Whelan's picture

(post #26953, reply #23 of 64)

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Not much action here, but I've just purchased a new IM pattern for a summer dress that is gorgeous. I think the number's 2315. Only three pattern pieces, but, oh, can he put them together! Needs a lightweight cotton or linen. I saw a beautiful waffle weave cotton blend that would be perfect and will pick it up tomorrow or Monday. Anyone else seen this pattern? I sure wish I had a figure left so that I could do some of his current jackets and pants! They look fabulous. Sue W.

cathi_chambley-miller's picture

(post #26953, reply #24 of 64)

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Sue-I bought those recent Issey patterns too! 2314 and 2315. I had already gotten the jacket Marcy Tilton described in Threads (2271).

Don't have any fabric in mind yet, but they looked like perfect summer vacation wear.

K.Kelly's picture

(post #26953, reply #25 of 64)

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Hi ladies,
I'm back! I just went up to New York to do research on my Miyake project and I met the president and got his card! So... now we can send copious letters to the Vogue offices in New york and hoepfully get some type of response! His name is:

Mr. Art Joinnides
President
Butterick Media
161 Sixth Avenue
New York, New york 10013
212 620 2552 (p)
212 620 2562 (f)
art@butterick.com
We need to bombard this man and let him know that he would have an audience if he reissued those old Miyake patterns!
On another note, those most recent patterns can be seen in all of their incarnations on www.First View.com in the Spring 99 collection. I think the dress would look fabulous in black linen and the top and pants that just came out would look better if they were split up and used with other pieces. Enjoy!

Alice_Olsen's picture

(post #26953, reply #26 of 64)

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I'm looking for the e-mail address for a sewing resource site the has the name "lyons" in it. Can anyone help me? I had it once and it got lost in the shuffle of my life.

TJ's picture

(post #26953, reply #27 of 64)

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Every time I see Linda Lee give a presentation at the Sewing Expo in Puyallup I run over to the Sewing Workshop booth and buy a bunch of patterns. Although they are wonderful to study, I haven't yet sewn any of them. What IS it with these Miyake-style designs anyway?!? are they as good to wear as they are fascinating to study as flat patterns? The "origami" aspect intrigues me and I wonder if anybody has tried these patterns in a stripe or other fabric that accents the changes of direction that seem to be features.

I am wondering about making the Kinenbi top symmetrical (two [longer] left fronts) -- has anybody tried this? I am also wondering about what weight fabric would be right for the Tahoe pant, which looks very wearable. I have some heavy linen in mind -- does a pattern like this (or Lotus or Origami skirt) need a lot of soft drape? Thanks!

Miriam_Maki's picture

(post #26953, reply #28 of 64)

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TJ,
Just to respond to a couple of your questions- the wonderful surprise to me when I started sewing Miyake patterns was the comfort and flexibility built into the designs. The coat from 1476 was the first thing I made and have always enjoyed wrapping it around myself in chilly, windy weather. I find his designs practical along with the interesting style.
I use the Miyake patterns for clothes that I wear every day because they offer a lot of freedom of movement and are useful for meeting the public or doing whatever physical activity that I'm involved with on a given day.
I like stripes and agree the Miyake patterns allow for some interesting play with directing stripes when you cut out the pieces. In fact, Miyake seems to be evaluating a similar use of pleats - having them go one way then another on a garment. I haven't seen the actual garments but have noticed this mostly in photos from fashion magazines.
I have the Kinenbi top but haven't sewn it yet. I too thought I'd try it first cutting both fronts from the left front pattern piece. Have you noticed the design ideas at the Sewing Workshop website?

Diane's picture

(post #26953, reply #29 of 64)

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I have seen the Kinenbi top made several times with two long fronts and it is great that way too. The Tahoe pant needs a drapey fabric--I have made them in wool jersey and love them. The same is true for the other two patterns you mentioned although the Lotus in linen is a possibility.

TJ's picture

(post #26953, reply #30 of 64)

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Thanks for the comments. Sounds like I should save my heavy linen for a jacket. What are the numbers you-all refer to with such familiarity, such as "the coat from 1476"? Are these Vogue Pattern numbers? Thanks!